A New Gag for an Old Goose

October 24, 2007

So, was the Roundhead party in the English Civil War justified in their actions, according to the Bible? Of course, this conflict is best viewed as a conflict between the Medieval and Modern views on the derivation of government, but I think it’s a great springboard for talking about the Puritan psyche in general.

Charles was unpopular for a number of reasons. He strove to be “above the law” as king. He believed he was answerable only to God. He was married to a Roman Catholic. He supported *GASP* Arminian clergy. He was a poor communicator and, as a statesman, probably very misunderstood. But let’s put him on trial again, here; and stick the Puritans in the dock with him.

The charges:

Answerable only to God

Hm … didn’t the Puritans feel the same way? How else could they convict their own monarch? Isn’t action against your sovereign the very definition of treason in a monarchy?

Intolerance of non-conformist religious ideas

The Puritans were far worse. Charles wanted to pardon Roman Catholics who were being persecuted for non-conformance; the Parliament wouldn’t let him. Charles favored moderation of Reformed (Calvinist) ideas … the Puritans didn’t want non-Reformed ideas allowed in England.

Money, money, money

A big reason for Charles’ unpopularity was the frequent wars he engaged in, and the accompanying taxes. From a standpoint of economy, though, is Charles ultimately responsible for the English Civil War, or is the Roundhead party? They are the rebels here, or rather the aggressor.

Any other arguments / defenses / accusations?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_I_of_England

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2 Responses to “A New Gag for an Old Goose”

  1. Lee Says:

    Umm…. I thought the Cavaliers supported Charles?

  2. Ben Says:

    Yes. Amended.


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